The Royal Commission has been engaging with key individuals, organisations, and communities to identify the lessons learned from Aotearoa New Zealand’s response to COVID-19 that should be applied in preparation for any future pandemic.

The initial tranche of our mahi has focused on identifying and examining information from a wide range of publicly available sources about the COVID-19 response, such as published reports or reviews.

We are currently hearing from the individuals, organisations, and communities that played a key role in Aotearoa New Zealand’s response. This includes decision and policy makers, Iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, academics and researchers, and many more. The insights, reflections, and perspectives of those we’ve met with so far have been a valuable source of information and evidence to the Inquiry.

The names of individuals and organisations listed below are published in accordance with “Minute 2: Inquiry meeting procedure and information gathering,” found on the "How We Will Work” page of our website. This list does not include any follow-up meetings we have held or plan to hold.

We will continue to update this list on a monthly basis.

You can also view video of some of the engagements here.

Record of Inquiry engagements

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington

  • Clemenger BBDO as the developers of the Unite Against COVID-19 campaign and collateral.
  • Dave Marè as a Senior Fellow at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Dr Maria Baker as the former Chief Executive Officer of Te Rau Ora.
  • New Zealand Council of Trade Unions Health and Safety Committee as health and safety representatives from various union member organisations.
  • Current and former Te Whatu Ora | Health New Zealand Chief Operating Officers as key individuals in the central North Island regional COVID-19 health response.
  • Members of the Press Gallery as key journalists reporting on the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • As part of a group meeting focusing on mis- and dis-information:
      • Advertising Standards Authority as the independent self-regulatory body that oversees advertising standards in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Te Mana Whanonga Kaipāho | Broadcasting Standards Authority as overseers and promoters of broadcasting standards on behalf of New Zealanders.
      • Te Mana Whakaatu | Classification Office as an independent Crown entity that aims to inform and empower New Zealanders to experience, understand, create and share content in a positive way, while also being safeguarded from harm.
      • David Shanks as the former Chief Censor of Te Mana Whakaatu | Classification Office.
  • Communications professionals within Manatū Hauora | Ministry of Health as individuals who held key health communications roles during the pandemic.
  • New Zealand Council of Trade Unions Legal Group as legal counsel representatives from unions representing people working in a wide range of sectors in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • As part of a regional and community media organisations group meeting:
      • Pacific Media Network as a key media network for all Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Otago Daily Times as one of the main daily newspaper providers in the South Island of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Ōtautahi | Christchurch

  • As part of a series of meetings facilitated by Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu:
      • Iwi governance and Papatipu Rūnaka as one of the largest Iwi in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Ngāi Tahu Holdings and Ngāi Tahu Seafood as a key commercial and business arm for the Ngāi Tahu Iwi.
      • Health and social service providers as teams dedicated to supporting and improving the wellbeing of Ngāi Tahu whānau.
  • Next Generation Conversation as a group of young people with strong interests in the environment and climate change.

Community-based engagements to support gathering public submissions

  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – Auckland Region Women’s Correctional Facility as the first purpose-built women’s prison in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Ōtepoti | Dunedin – community-based meetings with people of diverse backgrounds working in a variety of different sectors. This includes people from migrant, refugee, rainbow, and disabled communities; as well as those working in the charitable and not-for-profit, business, education, and health sectors.
  • Te Tai Tokerau | Northland – Northland Region Correctional Facility as a low-security men’s prison in Kaikohe.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – Korowai Manaaki as a youth justice residence in South Auckland.
  • Heretaunga | Hastings – Pasifika community as a group of individuals living in Hastings during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Heretaunga | Hastings – horticulture seasonal workers as a group of people working in the horticultural sector during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Ōtautahi | Christchurch – community volunteers as supporters of the Philipstown and wider Christchurch community.
  • Ōtautahi | Christchurch – workers as a group of individuals working in Christchurch during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington

  • Communication professionals within Te Tari o Te Pirimia Me Te Komiti Matua | Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet as individuals who held key communications and engagement roles in Aotearoa New Zealand’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission as an organisation that researches important infrastructure issues, advises on policies, and provides project support and performance data.
  • Dr Simon Chapple as an expert in public policy advice, with insights on the Government’s COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Scheme.
  • David Smol as a key individual experienced in public and private sector leadership.
  • Te Taurapa Tūhono | New Zealand Trade and Enterprise as the Government’s international business development agency.
  • International Accreditation New Zealand as the accreditation body of the Testing Laboratory Registration Council in New Zealand.
  • Dr Alan Bollard, Dr Graham Scott and Dr Murray Horn as former Secretaries to the New Zealand Treasury.
  • Dr Chris Wilson as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland with expertise in mis- and dis-information research.
  • As part of a COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Scheme meeting:
      • Te Tari Taake | Inland Revenue as Aotearoa New Zealand’s tax and social support government agency.
      • Hīkina Whakatutuki| Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment as a core government agency responsible for a broad range of advice and services that were critical during the COVID-19 pandemic response.
      • Te Manatū Whakahiato Ora | Ministry of Social Development as the primary provider of social policy advice to the government and sector lead for social development in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Te Tai Ōhanga | The Treasury as the Government’s lead economic and financial advisor.
  • Various Regional Public Service Commissioners as key individuals who coordinated between national policy and local implementation of those policies during the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • As part of a mis- and dis-information researchers group meeting:
      • The Disinformation Project as an independent research and advisory group that studies disinformation and its impacts in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Fight Against Conspiracy Theories (FACT) Aotearoa as a grassroots group of activists fighting harmful conspiracy theories and disinformation in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Dr Mona Krewel as a Senior Lecturer at Te Herenga Waka | Victoria University of Wellington with expertise in mis- and dis-information research.
  • As part of a media organisation group meeting:
      • Stuff Limited as one of the major media companies in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • New Zealand Media and Entertainment as one of the major media companies in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • BusinessDesk as a media organisation that covers Aotearoa New Zealand’s business and economic news.
      • Radio New Zealand as Aotearoa New Zealand’s public broadcaster, covering news, politics, sport, business, culture and more.
      • The Spinoff as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s independent media organisations that focuses on current affairs and pop culture.
  • Dr Lidia Morawska as an expert in the field of air quality and its impact on human health and the environment.
  • As part of a cultural sector Chief Executives group meeting:
      • Te Matatini Society Incorporated as an entity that provides kapa haka leadership at a regional level.
      • Pouhere Taonga | Heritage New Zealand as an autonomous Crown entity charged with identifying, preserving, promoting and advocating for Aotearoa New Zealand’s unique heritage.
      • Ihi Aotearoa | Sport New Zealand as the national organisation that leads and supports the play, active recreation, and sport sector in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Royal New Zealand Ballet as an independent charitable trust that aims to attract local and international dancers, choreographers and designers.
      • Irirangi Te Motu | Broadcasting Commission (New Zealand on Air) as an autonomous Crown entity established to reflect and develop Aotearoa New Zealand’s identity and culture by promoting programmes about New Zealand and New Zealand interests.
      • Te Reo Reka o Aotearoa | New Zealand Music Commission as an independent charitable trust that facilitates growth in Aotearoa New Zealand’s music industry.
      • Toi Aotearoa | Creative New Zealand as an autonomous Crown entity established to encourage, promote, and support the arts in Aotearoa New Zealand for the benefit of all New Zealanders.
      • Manatū Tāonga | Ministry for Culture and Heritage as the government agency that supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s arts, media, heritage, and sports organisations, as well as advising the government on cultural matters, and providing research and resources for everyone to access.
  • Te Whatu Ora workforce leads as key individuals in the COVID-19 response.
  • Public Service Association as a trade union that represents and supports more than 90,000 workers across central government, state-owned enterprises, local councils, health boards, and community groups within Aotearoa New Zealand.

Te Tai Tokerau | Northland

  • As part of a Whangārei Iwi representatives group meeting:
      • Ngātiwai Trust Board as a mandated Iwi authority for Ngātiwai Iwi.
      • Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua as the representative body and authorised voice to deal with issues affecting the whole of Ngāti Whātua.
  • As part of a Māori health and social service providers group meeting:
      • Mahitahi Hauora as Te Tai Tokerau Northland’s largest primary health organisation.
      • Te Hā Oranga ki Takiwira as an Iwi endorsed and owned health service provider that operates under the tikanga of Ngāti Whātua.
  • As part of a local government forum:
      • Far North District Council as the territorial authority for the Far North District of Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Kaipara District Council as the territorial authority for the Kaipara District of Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Northland Regional Council as the governing body for the Northland region.
      • Whangārei District Council as the territorial authority for the Whangārei District of Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Northland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group as the group responsible for civil defence emergency management in the region.
  • As part of a Kaikohe Iwi and hapū representatives group meeting:
      • Te Roroa Whatu Ora and Manawhenua Trust as an Iwi-owned entity responsible for the social development of Te Roroa.
      • Te Rūnanga a Iwi o Ngāpuhi as an Iwi organisation in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa as an Iwi organisation in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
  • Hauora Hokianga as providers of healthcare and wellbeing education to the people of Hokianga.
  • As part of a business and economics forum:
      • Business Paihia as a supporter and promoter of local businesses in Paihia.
      • Kaikohe Business Association as a supporter and promoter of local businesses in Kaikohe.
      • Kerikeri District Business Association as the supporter, promotor, and connector of local businesses in the Kerikeri district.
      • Northland Chamber of Commerce as the voice of business in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Northland Incorporated as Te Tai Tokerau Northland’s economic development agency.
      • Northland Experiences as the provider of cycling and walking tours in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Northland Forest Managers as an established forestry manager in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Northland Forestry Nursery as an established pine seedling nursey in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Summit Forests as an established forestry business in New Zealand.
  • As part of an education forum:
      • Kaikohe Christian School as a composite school providing both primary and secondary education.
      • Northland College as a co-educational secondary school in Kaikohe.
      • Okaihau College as a secondary school in the heart of Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Okaihau Primary School as a primary education provider in the heart of Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
      • Tautoro School as a rural primary education provider located outside of Kaikohe.
      • Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) as Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest state school that offers a wide range of personalised learning programmes and courses, most of which are delivered online.
      • Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Kaikohe as a Māori-language immersion school in the Kaikohe district.
  • Hone Harawira and members of Te Tai Tokerau Northland Border Control as key individuals who helped establish and enforce roadside checkpoints in the Northland region.
  • As part of a Kaitaia Iwi and hapū COVID-19 response group meeting:
      • Te Hiku Iwi Development Trust and COVID-19 Response Group as a coalition of Iwi, community groups, hauora and manaaki providers who served the community during the pandemic.
      • Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Takoto as a post-Treaty settlement governance entity of Ngāi Takoto.
      • Te Rūnanga o Te Rarawa as a governance board representing 23 hapū marae.
      • Whakawhiti Ora Pai as a primary health care provider in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
  • As part of a primary health care providers group meeting:
      • Te Hiku Hauora as a primary care practice with nurses, general practitioners and kaitiaki health assistance.
      • Te Whare Oranga as a primary care service provider run by a group of Māori practice nurses.
      • Whakawhiti Ora Pai as a primary health care provider in Te Tai Tokerau Northland.
  • As part of a social services providers forum:
      • Āupouri Ngāti Kahu Te Rarawa (ANT) Trust as an organisation that provides support to whānau in Kaitaia.
      • Claud Switzer Residential Care as an aged residential care provider in Kaitaia.
      • Te Rūnanga o Rarawa as a governance board representing 23 hapū marae.

Community-based engagements to support gathering public submissions

  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – Unity in our Community as a prominent charity providing community support in West and South Auckland.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – university students group meeting as a group of young people who attended Auckland universities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – small business owners group meeting as a group of small business owners based in South Auckland.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – disabled people group meeting as a group of young disabled adults living in Auckland.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – La’ei as a community-led dance and sewing school based in West and South Auckland.
  • Tauranga – horticulture workers group meeting as a group of people working in the horticultural sector during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland – Auckland South Correctional Facility as a high security men’s prison.
  • Te Tai Tokerau | Northland – kaumatua and kuia as a group of older people living in Northland during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Te Tai Tokerau | Northland – workers group meeting as a group of people living and working in Northland during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Te Tai Tokerau | Northland – students group meeting as a group of young people studying at secondary school in Northland during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Waikato – Spring Hill Correctional Facility as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s biggest prisons.
  • Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington – university students group meeting as a group of young people who attended Wellington universities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Porirua – community group meeting as a group of students, small business owners, workers and community leaders based in Porirua.
  • Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington – disabled rainbow community meeting as a group of young adults from the disabled rainbow community who experienced the COVID-19 pandemic in Wellington.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • Restaurant Association of New Zealand as the representative body for more than 2,500 hospitality businesses across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Taituarā as Aotearoa New Zealand’s leading membership network for professionals working in and for local government.
  • Financial Services Federation as the collective voice of the responsible, non-bank finance sector. 
  • As part of a small banking sector meeting:
      • Heartland Bank as the market leading reverse mortgage provider in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • SBS Bank as a member-owned New Zealand bank that that offers a range of products and services.
      • The Co-Operative Bank as a New Zealand-owned bank that offers a range of products and services.
      • TSB Bank as a New Zealand-owned and independent bank that offers a range of products and services.
  • Additional members of the COVID-19 Disability Response Network as a network of advocates for disabled communities throughout the response to COVID-19.
  • New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services as a representative body for six church networks.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • As part of a group meeting representing older people: 
      • He Manaakitanga Kaumātua Aotearoa | Age Concern New Zealand as an organisation that offers a range of information and support to older adults in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Alzheimers New Zealand as a national organisation representing and supporting people living with dementia (mate wareware) and their whānau.
      • Carers New Zealand as the national peak body providing information, advice, learning and support for carers in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Grey Power as an advocacy organisation protecting the welfare and wellbeing of older people.
  • Northern Regional Health Coordination Centre as a mechanism utilised during the COVID-19 response to provide regional coordination between Auckland, Waitemata, Manukau and Northland District Health Boards.
  • Te Kaunihera Wāhine o Aotearoa | National Council of Women New Zealand as an umbrella organisation working towards gender equality in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Manaaki Tāngata | Victim Support as an organisation that supports and empowers people, including their whānau and witnesses, who are directly affected by crime, suicide and traumatic event.
  • National Beneficiaries Advocacy Consultative Group as the representative of a national network of beneficiary advocacy groups that works with the Ministry for Social Development to support and assist people who may have difficulty in obtaining their full and correct entitlement.
  • Crown Law Office and Parliamentary Counsel Office to discuss the role both agencies played in assisting government decision-making and the development of legislation during the pandemic and how the structures and arrangements worked in practice. 
  • Health Transition Unit senior leaders, within Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, as a key function that designed and oversaw the introduction of the reformed Health and Disability System during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Rebecca Kitteridge as the former Director-General of Security and Chief Executive of Te Pā Whakamarumaru | New Zealand Security Intelligence Service and as the current Chief Executive of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • Peter Chambers as a key individual with expertise of supply chain, procurement, and operations practice.
  • Sarah Sparks as the former Chair of the Independent Community Panel that provided insights directly from rural, youth/aged, disabled, LGBTQIA+, Māori, Pacific, and other ethnic groups to the COVID-19 system.
  • Home and Community Health Association as the national voice for promoting and advancing excellence, partnerships and sustainability in the home and community health services sector.
  • As part of an ambulance group meeting:
      • Hato Hone St John Ambulance as a charitable organisation that is at the frontline of medical response providing ambulance and other health-related services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Wellington Free Ambulance as a provider of free ambulance and healthcare services for the Greater Wellington and Wairarapa regions.
  • New Zealand Nurses Organisation as the union and professional body for nursing in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Peter Boshier as the Chief Ombudsman, an independent Officer of Parliament who helps New Zealanders deal with public sector agencies.
  • Dr Corina Grey as a key individual in Pacific public health.
  • New Zealand Super Fund as a sovereign wealth fund that will pay the cost of universal pensions for future generations of New Zealanders in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Dr Nick Chamberlain as the National Director of the National Public Health Service and former Chief Executive of the Northland District Health Board.
  • As part of a midwifery group meeting:
      • Te Kāreti o ngā Kaiwhakawhānau ki Aotearoa | New Zealand College of Midwives as the professional organisation for midwives.
      • Te Tatau o te Whare Kahu | Midwifery Council as the responsible authority that protects the health and safety of women and pēpi experiencing midwifery care in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Ngā Maia Trust as a non-profit organisation that promotes and protects the tikanga values of traditional Māori birthing and parenting knowledge.
  • As part of an independent and integrated education providers meeting:
      • New Zealand Catholic Education Office as an organisation that works with proprietors of schools and diocesan educational bodies to promote a full understanding of Catholic education.
      • Independent Schools of New Zealand as the national body that represents independent (private) member schools in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Aotearoa Food Rescue Alliance to better understand the use of foodbanks, food rescue and community food services that help prevent food insecurity in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • General Practitioner Leaders’ forum as representatives from key peak bodies in the general medical practice.
  • Children’s Convention Monitoring Group as a collective committed to improving the lives of children in Aotearoa New Zealand and upholding their rights in accordance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Brendan Boyle as a former member of the COVID-19 Taskforce within the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • As part of family violence, sexual violence, and victim support group meetings:
      • Te Puna Aonui as an Interdepartmental Executive Board with various government agencies to align the whole-of-government strategy, policy, and investment to eliminate family violence and sexual violence.
      • National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges (also known as the Women’s Refuge) as a national organisation that provides advice, assistance and direct support to women and children experiencing family violence through their member refuges. 
      • Wellington Rape Crisis as a provider of specialist support services in Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington to survivors of sexual harm and their friends, family and whānau.
      • DOVE Hawkes Bay as a social service organisation in Te Matau-a-Māui | Hawkes Bay region that uses its specialist expertise in addressing violence in families to help individuals and whānau to live safely, respectfully and with dignity.
      • HELP Auckland as a specialist provider of sexual abuse support services for Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland.
      • STOP as an organisation that provides community-based assessment and intervention services for adolescents and adults who have engaged in harmful sexual behaviour and for children with concerning sexual behaviours.
      • The Backbone Collective as a national coalition that examines the system that responds to women and children escaping abuse and advocates for safer and more effective system.
      • Te Kupenga Whakaoti Mahi Patunga | National Network of Family Violence Services as a national body representing a range of specialist family violence services across Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • START as an organisation that provides early intervention, counselling and support for children, youth, and adults and their whānau who have experienced sexual violence or other trauma.
  • As part of a small business food supply forum:
      • New Zealand Food and Grocery Council as an industry association that represents the manufacturers and suppliers behind Aotearoa New Zealand’s food, beverage, and grocery brands.
      • New Zealand Pork as the statutory industry board that works to support Aotearoa New Zealand’s commercial pig farmers.
  • Various academic researchers to understand their research on contact tracing technology.
  • Adhikaar Aotearoa as a charitable organisation that provides support, education, and advocacy for LGBTQIA+ people of colour, particularly those of South Asian descent, in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • As part of a Rainbow community group meeting:
      • InsideOUT Kōaro as a national charity working to make Aotearoa New Zealand safer for all rainbow young people.
      • Tiwhanawhana Trust as a takatāpui community group based in Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington that welcomes people of diverse sexualities and gender identity.
      • Gender Minorities Aotearoa as a nationwide transgender organisation that provides supports for transgender people of all ages, cultures, and backgrounds.
  • As part of a construction sector group meeting:
      • Master Builders Association as a membership organisation representing a significant part of Aotearoa New Zealand's building and construction fraternity.
      • Civil Contractors New Zealand as an incorporated society that represents the interests and aspirations of more than 800 member organisations – including large, medium-sized and small businesses in civil engineering, construction and general contracting. 

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • Te Amorangi Mātauranga Matua | Tertiary Education Commission as a Crown agency leading the Government’s relationship with the tertiary education sector in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Iwi Chairs Forum Pandemic Response Group (including Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Climate Change Iwi Leaders Group, Te Arataura, and Te Rūnanga ā Iwi ō Ngāpuhi) as a group who provided a platform for their members, other Iwi and Māori groups who sought support to elevate critical needs and reprioritise policy programmes of the Crown during the pandemic.
  • Federated Farmers COVID-19 Response Group (including the Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Pork, Beef and Lamb New Zealand) as a group focused on the impact of COVID-19 policy and regulations on the rural community.
  • Maritime New Zealand as a Crown entity that provides national regulatory, compliance and response for the safety, security, and environmental protection of coastal and inland waterways.
  • Te Tāhū Hauora | Health Quality & Safety Commission as a Crown entity that focuses on improving health and disability support services.
  • Keriana Brooking as a key individual in her former role as the Deputy Chief Executive of the COVID-19 Health System Response at Manatū Hauora | Ministry of Health.
  • Professor Sue Crengle and Dr Matire Harwood as leading Māori health advisors.
  • Deputy Commissioner Wally Haumaha and Deputy Chief Executive Pieri Munro as key individuals in their roles in the Iwi and Partnerships division at Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa | New Zealand Police.
  • Port of Tauranga Ltd as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest ports.
  • Te Pūtea Matua | Reserve Bank of New Zealand as Aotearoa New Zealand’s central bank.
  • Te Kāhui Inihua o Aotearoa | Insurance Council of New Zealand as a representative body for fire and general insurance companies.
  • Te Hautū Kahurangi | New Zealand Tertiary Education Union as a movement of people working collectively to defend and promote quality public tertiary education that is accessible to all.
  • Various independent economic commentators as a group of expert economists from across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Various Medical Officers of Health as public health doctors who specialise in the health of population groups or whole communities.
  • Chief Executives from port companies across Aotearoa New Zealand as the leaders of companies that provide essential infrastructure in Aotearoa New Zealand’s supply chain.
  • Barnardos New Zealand and Whānau Āwhina | Plunket as charities supporting tamariki and whānau across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Rūnanga o te Kauae Kaimahi as a representative body for Māori workers whose unions are affiliated with Te Kauae Kaimahi | the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
  • As part of a pharmacy group forum:
      • Pharmaceutical Society of New Zealand Inc. as the professional membership organisation that represents pharmacists and pharmacy technicians from all sectors of pharmacy practice in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Pharmacy Guild of New Zealand as a membership organisation that provides support and services to community pharmacy owners.
      • Green Cross Health as a provider of primary health care services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Te Pou Whakamana Kaimatū o Aotearoa | Pharmacy Council New Zealand as the governing body that ensures pharmacists are competent and fit to practise.
      • Te Kāhui Whakarite Rongoā Hōhipera o Aotearoa | New Zealand Hospital Pharmacy Association as a not-for-profit organisation which represents the views of and advocates for hospital pharmacy staff.
      • Ngā Kaitiaki o Te Puna Rongoā o Aotearoa | the Māori Pharmacists’ Association as a national health and advocacy group for Māori pharmacists.
      • Clinical Advisory Pharmacists’ Association as an organisation that provides core support to prescribing pharmacists in the primary care sector.
  • Steve Brazier as a key individual with experience in emergency and pandemic management.
  • As part of a group meeting focusing on services for children and young people:
      • Youthline as an organisation that supports young people throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Ara Taiohi as a peak body for youth development.
      • Whakarongo Mai | Voice of the Young and Care Experienced as an independent charity that helps to advocate for children in foster or whānau care in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Health Data and Digital Group (including Manatū Hauora | Ministry of Health, Te Whatu Ora | Health New Zealand) to better understand the health data and digital tools and systems.
  • Various laboratory sector representatives to understand their experiences in processing COVID-19 tests and future planning.
  • As part of a transport and logistics workshop:
      • Maersk as a global organisation that offers integrated logistics solutions that connect, protect, and simplify their customers’ supply chains.
      • KiwiRail as a state-owned enterprise that operates rail freight, ferry, property and tourism businesses.
      • New Zealand Couriers as Aotearoa New Zealand’s leading courier company.
      • Customs Brokers & Freight Forwarders Federation of New Zealand as an independent organisation that promotes the interests of all its members in the wider transport industry.

Kirikiriroa | Hamilton

  • Te Whatu Ora regional directors as public health leaders in Te Manawa Taki | the Midland region.
  • Pinnacle Midlands Health Network (including independent GPs, and Pharmacy 547) as a primary care network that provides health services to Te Manawa Taki | the Midland region.
  • Waikato Public Health Unit as the providers of public health services in the Waikato and Ruapehu regions.
  • As part of a local government forum:
      • Te Kaunihera o Kirikiriroa | Hamilton City Council as the governing body of the Hamilton region.
      • Te Kaunihera aa Takiwaa o Waikato | Waikato District Council as the governing body for the Waikato District region.
      • Te Kaunihera ā Rohe o Waikato | Waikato Regional Council as the governing body responsible for managing the Waikato region’s natural resources, economy, and quality of life.
      • Waipā District Council as the governing body for the Waipā region.
  • As part of a business and economic forum:
      • Waikato Chamber of Commerce as an advocate on issues that affect and relate to local businesses.
      • Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato | University of Waikato as a tertiary education provider in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Te Waka, Waikato Economic Development as a business-led and governed organisation that drives economic growth in the Waikato. 

Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland

  • Te Tāpui Atawhai | Auckland City Mission as a non-profit organisation that provides practical support to those in need.
  • Kāinga Ora | Homes and Communities as a Crown entity that delivers housing and urban development in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • As part of an ethnic community’s service providers group meeting (convened by Te Tari Mātāwaka | Ministry of Ethnic Communities):
      • New Zealand Ethnic Women's Trust as an organisation that supports women of all ethnicities.
      • Wellbeing Charitable Trust as an Auckland based charity group that provides mental health and family violence support to ethnic groups.
      • Korean Positive Aging Charitable Trust as a community-based support group for Korean families that offers services to foster inclusive communities.
      • New Zealand Filipino Santo Nino Devotee Trust (Sinulog) as the biggest gathering of Filipinos in Aotearoa New Zealand who connect with the Ministry for Social Development to offer services for the Filipino community.
      • Mount Roskill Collective as a group that provides direction and guidance to secondary ethnic refugee and migrant ākonga (students).
      • Refugees as Survivors New Zealand as a charitable trust that offers a mental health and wellbeing service for refugees in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Muskaan Care Trust as a non-profit organisation that aims to improve the quality of life for people living with disadvantages, such as blood disorders, mental health conditions, disabilities, and social exclusion.
      • New Zealand Sikh Women's Association as group that provides support to women and children within the Southeast Asian community.
      • Aotearoa Africa Foundation as an organisation that advocates for the wellbeing of African communities in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • New Zealand Nepal Society Inc. as non-profit organisation that supports individuals of Nepali descent and promotes ethnic harmony in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • CNSST Foundation as an organisation that offers comprehensive services and support to the Asian community in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Asian Family Services as a non-profit organisation that provides counselling, public education, and support for all Asians in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Korean Community Wellness Society Inc. as a group of medical professionals of Korean descent who promote the wellbeing of Koreans in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • As part of a Pasifika leaders forum (convened by the Ministry for Pacific Peoples):
      • Church leaders (including the Auckland region’s Free Church of Tonga, Congregational Christian Church, and 7 Day Adventist Church) as religious organisations that provide pastoral support for Pacific people.
      • Trinity Methodist Theological College as a centre for theological teaching, research, and training of transformative leaders for society and church.
      • New Zealand Kiribati National Council as the national body for Kiribati people in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Tuvalu Auckland Community Trust as charitable trust that supports the wellbeing of the Tuvaluan community in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Air New Zealand as Aotearoa New Zealand’s national airline that provides passenger and cargo transport services in New Zealand and to/from overseas destinations.
  • As part of a Pasifika health providers forum:
      • Pacific Perspectives as an independent Pacific health provider.
      • GPs from within the Pacific community as trusted providers of health in their communities.
      • The Fono as a leader in delivering health outcomes for the people who need it most, and fostering well, safe, vibrant, and informed communities.
      • South Seas Healthcare as a trusted Pacific communities health provider.
      • Vaka Tautua as a mental health, disability and social service provider that is ’by Pacific, for Pacific’ in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Kidz First as a provider of family-centred health care in the Manukau community.
      • Nga Hau Mangere Birthing Centre as a primary birthing centre for the South Auckland community.
      • Treasured Older Adults Pacific as a not-for-profit organisation that promotes the rights, safety, and wellbeing of older people, Aiga carers and Pacific families.
      • The Cause Collective as a Pacific-led health and community services organisation.
      • Penina Trust as a Pacific-led health non-government organisation that supports the people of South Auckland.
      • Te Whatu Ora | Health New Zealand as the leaders of the day-to-day services and functions in Aotearoa New Zealand’s health system.
  • As part of a business and economic forum:
      • Downer Group Ltd as a leading provider of integrated services in Aotearoa New Zealand that designs, builds and sustains assets, infrastructure and facilities.
      • Woolworths New Zealand (formerly Countdown) as one of the largest supermarket operators in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Fisher & Paykel Healthcare as a leading designer, manufacturer and marketer of products and systems for use in acute and chronic respiratory care.
      • Datacom as a leading technology business and IT solutions provider.
  • Whakarongorau Aotearoa | New Zealand Telehealth Services as a digital health provider for Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • District representatives from Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa | New Zealand Police as the governing body in the overall response to Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland’s border and other controls during the pandemic.

Tāhuna | Queenstown

  • Queenstown Lakes District Council as the governing body for the Queenstown Lakes District.
  • Ngāi Tahu Tourism as one of the largest tourism operators in Aotearoa New Zealand and owned by the biggest Iwi in Te Waipounamu | the South Island.
  • As part of a large business forum:
      • Central Wine Growers Association as a collaborative group of grape growers and winemakers in the Central Otago region.
      • Real New Zealand as a business that offers tourism experiences from Stewart Island to Queenstown.
      • AJ Hackett Bungy New Zealand as a business that offers adventure tourism.
      • Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust as an independent, not for profit, community owned organisation that provides affordable housing in Queenstown, Arrowtown, Wānaka, Lake Hāwea.
      • Queenstown Resort College as a tourism, business, and technology education provider.
      • Skyline Enterprises as a company with an expansive tourism portfolio in Aotearoa New Zealand and overseas.
      • Queenstown Business Chamber of Commerce as the voice of the Queenstown business community.
  • As part of a small to medium business forum:
      • Backpacker Youth Adventure Tourism Association as an independent voice of the backpacking and adventure travel industry in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Arrowtown Business and Promotion Association as the representative body for Arrowtown businesses.
      • South Island representatives from Hospitality NZ as the voice of hospitality in the South Island.
      • In2Food as catering, event, and hospitality professionals in the Queenstown and Wanaka regions.
      • Both Brains as a managed IT services provider.
      • Millbrook Resort as a five-star accommodation provider and lifestyle resort.
      • Highview Apartments as a local luxury accommodation provider.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • As part of a school principals’ peak bodies group meeting:
      • Secondary Principals Association New Zealand as the only independent organisation representing New Zealand secondary principals.
      • Secondary Principals’ Council of Aotearoa as the representatives for secondary and area school principals who are members of the Post Primary Teachers’ Association.
  • Andy Milne as the former Deputy Secretary at Hīkina Whakatutuki| Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment for the Managed Isolation Quarantine facilities.
  • Te Kōmihana Whai Hua o Aotearoa | New Zealand Productivity Commission as an independent Crown Entity that provides advice to the government on improving productivity in a way that supports the overall wellbeing of New Zealanders, a wide range of communities of interest, and population groups in New Zealand society.
  • Te Riu Roa | New Zealand Education Institute as the largest education sector union in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Wehengarua | Post Primary Teachers’ Association as the professional association and union of teachers and principals committed to improving secondary education for New Zealand students.
  • As part of a Māori broadcasting group meeting:
      • Whakaata Māori (formerly known as Māori Television) as Aotearoa New Zealand’s national indigenous media organisation.
      • Te Māngai Pāho as an independent Crown entity that acts first and foremost as a Māori language agency.
  • As part of a tertiary students’ association group meeting:
      • New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations as the advocacy group representing students in universities and polytechnics across Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • New Zealand International Students’ Association as an umbrella body that represents the collective voice among international students studying in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Te Mana Ākonga | Māori Tertiary Students’ Association as an advocacy and support body for tauira Māori throughout Aotearoa New Zealand in Tertiary Education.
      • National Disabled Students’ Association as a non-partisan national body that represents disabled tauira, and aims to challenge the collective barriers facing disabled tauira within the tertiary education space.
  • Network 4 Learning as a Crown-owned technology company that connects schools and kura across Aotearoa New Zealand to safe and reliable internet.
  • New Zealand Pasifika Principals Association as a representative body proactively advancing Pasifika education.
  • As part of a Māori medium education group meeting:
      • Te Rūnanga Nui o Ngā Kura Kaupapa Māori o Aotearoa as the national collective body of kura kaupapa Māori.
      • Ngā Kura ā Iwi o Aotearoa as an organisation focused on the wellbeing of students, and the flow on effects to families and communities for generations.
      • Te Kōhanga Reo Trust as a movement which works to build rich language and cultural spaces alongside whānau, where they are involved in their children’s learning.
  • Te Akatea | Māori Principals’ Association as a representative body for Māori leaders in kura across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Manapou ki te Ao | Education New Zealand as a government agency that promotes Aotearoa New Zealand as a study destination and supports the delivery of education services offshore.
  • Te Mana Mātāpono Matatapu | The Office of the Privacy Commissioner as an independent crown entity with a focus on maintaining privacy rights.
  • MartinJenkins as an organisational, financial, economic, and public policy consultancy agency.
  • Professor Michael Plank and Professor Shaun Hendy as prominent mathematics and science researchers in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Manatū Waka | Ministry of Transport as the Government’s system lead on transport.
  • Christchurch Airport as a key airport for the South Island.
  • Te Aka Whai Ora | Māori Health Authority as an independent statutory authority to drive improvement in hauora Māori and to lead and coordinate the delivery of health services across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Accident Compensation Corporation as the crown entity set up under the Accident Compensation Act 2001 to deliver injury prevention initiatives and no-fault injury cover for everyone in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Rōpū Wāhine Māori Toko i te Ora | Māori Women’s Welfare League Inc. as the only national charitable Māori women’s organisation in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Mana Ārai o Aotearoa | New Zealand Customs Service as the government department that stops any potential dangers, hazards and threats from entering Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • The Right Honourable Dame Helen Winkelmann, Justice Susan Thomas, and Justice Mark Cooper as key individuals in Aotearoa New Zealand’s justice system.
  • Te Tari Taiwhenua | Department of Internal Affairs as the government department that serves and connects people, communities and government to build a safe, prosperous and respected nation.
  • Manatū Aorere | New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade as the government department that acts on the world stage to build a safer, more prosperous and more sustainable future for New Zealanders.
  • Manatū Tāonga | Ministry for Culture and Heritage as the government agency that supports many of Aotearoa New Zealand’s arts, media, heritage, and sports organisations, as well as advising the government on cultural matters, and providing research and resources for everyone to access.
  • Waka Kotahi | New Zealand Transport Agency as the government agency that supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s land transport system to connect people, products and places.
  • Justice Sector Leadership Board (including representatives from Te Tāhū o te Ture | Ministry of Justice, Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa | New Zealand Police, Ara Poutama Aotearoa | Department of Corrections, and Oranga Tamariki | Ministry for Children) as senior leaders from the core justice sector government agencies.
  • Early Childhood Council as a non-profit organisation that represents the interests of independently owned early childhood centres in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Kaunihera Māori o Aotearoa | New Zealand Māori Council as advocates for policy development and community initiatives that contribute to te mana motuhake o te Iwi Māori.
  • Institute of Environmental Science and Research as a Crown Research Institute that plays a critical national role in public health and forensics.
  • Ngā Tamariki Puāwai o Tāmaki | Auckland Kindergarten Association as Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest Kindergarten Association.
  • Barbara Ala'alatoa as the former Principal of Sylvia Park School in South Auckland.
  • National Hauora Coalition Group as a charitable social enterprise and Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest Māori-led Public Health Organisation.
  • Dame Naida Glavish as a Pou Tangata and Hauora lead for the National Iwi Chairs Forum, and as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most prominent Māori leaders.
  • Te Whatu Ora Executive Leadership Team as key decision-makers within the health sector.
  • New Zealand Red Cross as a humanitarian network of more than 10,000 members, volunteers and staff working to support people throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Tauihu o Ngā Wānanga as a collective of three Wānanga in Aotearoa New Zealand – Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Te Wānanga o Raukawa, and Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.
  • Te Pūkenga as Aotearoa new Zealand’s largest tertiary education provider. 

Ōtautahi | Christchurch

  • As part of a rural and farming forum:
      • Federated Farmers (Mid-Canterbury) as a key, independent rural advocacy organisation.
      • Rural Leaders as an organisation that works closely with partner organisations, alumni and industry networks to collaborate on projects that ensure Aotearoa New Zealand remains at the global forefront of food and fibre.
      • Rural Women New Zealand as the voice on health services, education, environment and social issues in the rural sector.
      • Rural Support Trust (Mid-Canterbury) as part of a nationwide network that can assist individuals and communities during and after extreme weather and other adverse advents.
  • As part of a local government forum:
      • Christchurch City Council as the governing body of the Christchurch region.
      • Selwyn District Council as the governing body of the Selwyn region.
      • Waimakariri District Council as the governing body of the Waimakariri region.
      • Environment Canterbury Regional Council as the governing body of the Canterbury region, working alongside Ngāi Tahu.
  • As part of a business and economics forum:
      • Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce as the voice of Canterbury business.
      • Christchurch NZ as the city’s sustainable economic development and city profile agency.
      • Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha | University of Canterbury as a tertiary education provider in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Giesen Group as a family-owned winery business in the Marlborough region.
      • Christchurch Casino Ltd as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s casinos.
      • Ravensdown as an organisation that provides innovative farming support.
  • Nurse Maude as a large and diverse organisation providing care across Canterbury and extending to Nelson/Marlborough and Wellington.
  • As part of a primary health organisation group meeting
      • Christchurch Primary Health Organisation as a not-for-profit health care services provider in the Canterbury region.
      • Waitaha Primary Health as a provider and supporter of health services in Canterbury’s rural and urban communities.
      • The Canterbury Initiative as a key project undertaken by Te Whatu Ora that focuses on addressing and resolving the challenges of health care in Canterbury.
      • The Canterbury Primary Response Group as a collective of health professionals and provider organisations tasked by Te Whatu Ora to lead the Canterbury district’s primary care emergency planning, response, and recovery.
  • Te Whatu Ora regional directors as public health leaders from across the South Island.
  • Te Mana Ora | Community & Public Health as the providers of public health services in Canterbury, South Canterbury, the West Coast and Chatham Islands.
  • Heritage and Rosewood Lifecare as aged residential care providers.
  • Aged Care Association New Zealand as the advocators for and representatives of approximately 93% of Aotearoa New Zealand’s aged residential care sector.

Te Papa-i-Oea | Palmerston North

  • Palmerston North hospital as the base regional hospital in Palmerston North.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington

  • Te Tari Arotake Mātauranga | Education Review Office as the Government’s external evaluation agency that informs and facilitates the improvement in early learning services, kōhanga reo, puna kōhungahunga, kura and schools.
  • Te Kāhui Tika Tangata | Human Rights Commission as an independent Crown entity and Aotearoa New Zealand’s national human rights institution.
  • Te Toihau Hauora, Hauātanga | Health and Disability Commissioner as an independent Crown entity that promotes and protects people’s rights (as set out in the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights).
  • Mana Mokopuna | Children and Young People’s Commission as an independent Crown entity advocating for all mokopuna aged under 18 in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Mana Tohu Mātauranga o Aotearoa | New Zealand Qualifications Authority as a Crown entity that administers educational assessments and qualifications.
  • Deputy Prime Minister Hon Carmel Sepuloni primarily as the current Minister for Social Development and Employment and the Minister/Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage; as well as the former Minister for Disability Issues, former Minister for ACC, and former Associate Minister for Pacific Peoples.
  • Māori Wardens as a network of community volunteers providing key supportive services across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • He Toa Takitini | New Zealand Māori Tourism as a leading agency in the Māori tourism sector, supporting leaders and partnerships that generate value in the Māori and wider tourism sector.
  • Business New Zealand as Aotearoa New Zealand's largest advocacy group for enterprise, representing thousands of businesses across the country.
  • Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) as Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest state school that offers a wide range of personalised learning programmes and courses, most of which are delivered online.
  • Te Tāhū o te Ture | Ministry of Justice as the Government’s lead provider on a range of justice services across Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa | New Zealand Police as the government agency that delivers services to ensure people can be safe and feel safe in their homes, on our roads, and in their communities.
  • Me Uru Kahikatea | Federation of Māori Authorities Inc. as a collective of Māori trusts and organisations across Aotearoa that help members to proposer, grow and achieve greater returns, increasing exports and Gross Domestic Product (GDP).
  • Oranga Tamariki | Ministry for Children as the government agency responsible for the care and protection of children and young people whose wellbeing is at significant risk of harm, as well as addressing offending by children and young people.
  • Manatū Kaupapa Waonga | Ministry of Defence and Te Ope Kātua o Aotearoa | New Zealand Defence Force as two government agencies responsible for keeping Aotearoa New Zealand safe and protected.
  • Tumuaki o te Mana Arotake | Office of the Auditor General as an independent agency that provides the Parliament and the public with a view of how public organisations are operating.
  • Manatū Wahine | Ministry for Women as the Government’s principal advisor on improving the lives of wāhine | women and kōtiro | girls in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Puna Aonui | Interdepartmental Executive Board for the Elimination of Family Violence and Sexual Violence as a joint venture with government agencies to align whole-of-government strategy, policy, and investment to eliminate family violence and sexual violence.
  • Te Tūāpapa Kura Kāinga | Ministry for Housing and Urban Development as the government agency that shapes the strategies and work programmes for housing and urban development in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Ara Poutama Aotearoa | Department of Corrections as the government agency that provides a range of programmes that help to reduce re-offending.

Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland

  • Waipareira Trust as a services and support provider for whānau of all ages in West Auckland.
  • Whai Māia - Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust as entities focused on advancing the cultural, social and environmental aspirations of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.
  • As part of an Auckland regional boundary business forum:
      • Auckland Policy Office as a representative body made up of central government agencies with a focus on Auckland policy and growth.
      • Restaurant Association of New Zealand as a key advocacy group and support provider for restaurants.
      • Tātaki Auckland Unlimited as Auckland’s economic and cultural agency committed to making the region a desirable place to live, work, visit, invest and do business. 
      • Heart of the City Auckland as the business association for Auckland’s city centre.
      • Retail New Zealand as the voice of the retail sector in Aotearoa New Zealand.
      • Employers and Manufacturers Association as a key entity with a view on business support measures and other settings that affected businesses during the COVID-19 response.
  • Auckland International Airport as New Zealand’s largest airport.
  • Auckland Council Community Panel Chairs and Co-Chairs as advisors to the Auckland Council on the interests and preferences of a variety of communities.
  • Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland Council as the governing body of the Auckland region.
  • Faith-based leaders (convened by the Ministry of Ethnic Communities) as leaders and influencers in their respective communities.
  • Foodstuffs North Island as an umbrella cooperative organisation for several grocery brands in the North Island.
  • Manukau Urban Māori Authority as a pan-tribal organisation that sets out to foster the economic, social, and community development of Māori living in cities.
  • Associate Professor Siouxsie Wiles as a key science communicator and researcher during the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Auckland City Hospital as New Zealand's largest public hospital and clinical research facility.

Tairāwhiti | Gisborne visit

  • Turanga and Tairawhiti Iwi:
      • Te Runanganui o Ngāti Porou as a prominent Iwi organisation in the Tairāwhiti Gisborne region.
      • Te Aitanga a Mahaki Trust as a prominent Iwi organisation in the Tairāwhiti Gisborne region.
      • Tāmanuhiri Tūtū Poroporo Trust as a prominent Iwi organisation in the Tairāwhiti Gisborne region.
      • Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust as a prominent Iwi organisation in the Tairāwhiti Gisborne region.
      • Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa as a prominent Iwi organisation in the Tairāwhiti Gisborne region.
  • Turanga and Tairawhiti Iwi health providers:
      • Te Hauora o Turanganui a Kiwi Ltd | Turanga Health as an Iwi health provider and general practice clinic.
      • Ngāti Porou Oranga as an integrated health, development and support services provider.
      • Turanga and Tairawhiti Hapū leads and Community Hub representatives.
  • As part of a health providers and networks forum: 
      • Te Whatu Ora Tairāwhiti as the Gisborne region’s health board.
      • Takatu Hub as a health and wellbeing call centre service for whānau in Tairāwhiti who need immediate health advice and support.
      • Pinnacle Incorporated Tairāwhiti as a group of not-for-profit primary health care organisations.
      • Three Rivers Medical as a primary health care centre providing a variety of facilities.
  • Te Kaunihera o Te Tairāwhiti | Gisborne District Council as the governing body of the Tairāwhiti | Gisborne region.
  • As part of a business and economic forum:
      • Trust Tairāwhiti as a regional wellbeing trust with a strategic focus on community initiatives, economic development and providing for future generations.
      • Cedenco Foods New Zealand as Aotearoa New Zealand’s leading ingredients company.
      • Kaiaponi Farms as the growers and producers of apples, citrus fruits, feijoas and kiwifruit.
      • People Plus as a human resources, employment relations, immigration, and recruitment specialist organisation.
  • As part of an education-focused forum:
      • Te Aho o Māui | Tairāwhiti Eastern Institute of Technology as one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s leading tertiary education providers, serving the Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti regions.
      • Matapuna Training Centre as a provider of courses designed to help participants move towards a career of their choice.
      • Tolaga Bay Area School as a local primary education provider.
      • Kaiti School as a local primary education provider.
      • Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga | Ministry of Education as the Government’s lead advisor on Aotearoa New Zealand’s education system; specifically focusing on the Tairāwhiti region.
      • Te Wānanga o Aotearoa as a provider of holistic education opportunities of the highest quality for Māori, peoples of Aotearoa, and the world.
      • Gisborne Boys’ High School as a local secondary education provider.
      • Ilminster Intermediate School as a local primary education provider.
      • David Langford as a former principal in a range of rural, urban, high and low decile schools.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington

  • Federated Farmers of New Zealand as a key, independent rural advocacy organisation.
  • COVID-19 Disability Response Network as a network of advocates for disabled communities throughout the response to COVID-19.
  • Sir Ashley Bloomfield as the former Director-General of Health.
  • Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga | Ministry of Education as the Government’s lead advisor on New Zealand’s education system.
  • Tatauranga Aotearoa | Stats NZ as the Government’s lead data and statistics agency.
  • Public Sector Health agency Chief Executives and Deputy Chief Executives (Manatū Hauora | Ministry of Health, Te Aka Whai Ora | Māori Health Authority, Te Whatu Ora | Health New Zealand, Whaikaha | Ministry of Disabled People, and Te Aho o Te Kahu | Cancer Control Agency) to understand the best approach in facilitating engagements with the wider health sector.
  • Dr Caroline McElnay as the former Director of Public Health.
  • Te Kaunihera Rata o Aotearoa | Medical Council of New Zealand as a key organisation in Aotearoa New Zealand that strives to protect and promote public health and safety.
  • Shayne Hunter as the former Deputy Director-General for the Data & Digital division at the Ministry of Health.
  • Te Kaunihera Tapuhi o Aotearoa | Nursing Council of New Zealand as the regulatory authority for nurses in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Pai Ora o Aotearoa | Social Service Providers Aotearoa as a wide-ranging national organisation comprising of over 200 community-based social organisations in rural and urban areas around Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Manatū Ahu Matua | Ministry for Primary Industries as a core government agency responsible for a broad range of advice and services that were critical during the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • Te Kaunihera o Ngā Kāreti Rata o Aotearoa | Council of Medical Colleges as the representative body for Aotearoa New Zealand’s 17 medical colleges (responsible for training, examining, and recertifying medical practitioners across a range of specialities).
  • Kāhui Mataika o te Motu | National Ethics Advisory Committee as an independent group of experts (in a variety of fields) who determine nationally consistent ethical standards across the health sector and provide scrutiny for national health and research services.
  • Peter Mersi as the former Chief Executive of the Ministry of Transport and a former head of the COVID-19 All of Government Response Group.
  • Te Arawhiti | Office for Māori Crown Relations as the Government’s leading agency for Māori-Crown relationships.
  • Border Executive Board as a single border voice and point of contact in the All of Government COVID-19 response.
  • Te Rāku Whakamarumaru | National Emergency Management Agency as the steward, operator, and assurer of the emergency management system; and Sarah Stuart-Black as the former Director Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) and CDEM National Controller.
  • Dr Shane Reti as a Member of Parliament and National party spokesperson for the Health, Māori-Crown Relations, and Pacific Peoples portfolios.
  • Hon Andrew Little primarily as the former Minister of Health; as well as the previous Minister of Justice, the Minister for Courts, and the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety.
  • Professor Michael Baker, Professor Nick Wilson and Dr Amanda Kvalsvig as members of the University of Otago COVID-19 Research Group.
  • Te Kauae Kaimahi | New Zealand Council of Trade Unions Affiliate Unions as the united voice for working people and their families, bringing together 27 affiliated unions.
  • Hon Dr David Clark primarily as the former Minister of Health.
  • Hon Peeni Henare primarily in relation to the work of the Māori Caucus in the COVID-19 response.
  • Hon Dr Megan Woods primarily as the current Minister of Housing, as well as the Minister for Building and Construction.
  • Key individuals involved in the Managed Isolation and Quarantine facilities, including public and private sector representatives, to discuss the provision and operation of the facilities.
  • Professor Dame Juliet Gerrard as a key individual in the All of Government Response to COVID-19, a key advisor to decision-makers, and as a leader amongst science advisors.
  • Hon Aupito William Sio primarily as the former Minister for Pacific Peoples and in relation to the work of the Pacific Caucus at the time.
  • Professor Ian Town as a key individual in the Ministry of Health and All of Government response to COVID-19.
  • Hon Marama Davidson and Hon James Shaw as the Green Party co-leaders and Members of Parliament during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hon Davidson was also a member of the Epidemic Response Committee.
  • Rt Hon Prime Minister Chris Hipkins primarily as the former Minister of Education, the former Minister of Health, and the first Minister for the COVID-19 Response.
  • Te Hiringa Mahara | Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission as the entity responsible for assessing and reporting on the status of, and the influencing factors on, the mental health and wellbeing of people in New Zealand. They also report on the effectiveness and efficiency of approaches and services, as well as provide recommendations for improvements.
  • David Seymour primarily as a member of the COVID-19 Epidemic Response Committee, as well as the ACT party member with the portfolio for COVID-19 response.
  • Hon Grant Robertson primarily as the current Minister of Finance; as well as the former Minister for Infrastructure, former Minister for Earthquake Commission, current Minister for Sport and Recreation, and former Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage.
  • Hon Kelvin Davis primarily as the current Minister for Māori-Crown Relations, Minister for Children, and Minister of Corrections; as well as the Associate Minister of Education (Māori Education).
  • Hon Dr Ayesha Verrall primarily as the former Associate Minister of Health, as well as the former Associate and lead Minister for the COVID-19 Response, and the current Minister of Health.
  • Sir David Skegg as Chair of the Strategic COVID-19 Public Health Advisory Group and a member of the International Science Council’s working group on future scenarios for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • Peter Hughes as the Public Service Commissioner and Head of Service.
  • Te Puni Kōkiri | Ministry of Māori Development as the Government’s principal policy advisor on Māori wellbeing and development.
  • Dr Peter Crabtree as the lead of the Strategy and Policy function in the All of Government response (March-June 2020) and the Chair of the Vaccine Taskforce (July 2020-January 2021). 
  • John Ombler as the All of Government Controller (March-July 2020) within the National Crisis Management Centre.
  • Sir Brian Roche as the former Chair of the COVID-19 Independent Continuous Review, Improvement and Advice Group. 

Tāmaki Makaurau | Auckland

  • Rt Hon Dame Jacinda Ardern as the former Prime Minister of Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Hon Simon Bridges as the former Leader of the Opposition and former Chair of the COVID-19 Epidemic Response Committee.
  • Employers and Manufacturers Association as a key entity with a view on business support measures and other settings that affected businesses during the COVID-19 response.
  • Professor Sir Peter Gluckman as the Director of Koi Tū: the Centre for Informed Futures, an independent research centre.
  • Rob Fyfe as a key individual involved in the response to COVID-19 through his business-led philanthropic venture, as a business advisor to the previous Prime Minister, and as a member of the COVID-19 Independent Continuous Review, Improvement and Advice Group.
  • Sir Collin Tukuitonga as a prominent public health expert who also acted as a Pacific community liaison and technical/expert advisor in government advisory groups.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • Te Niwha as a group that brings together research providers, iwi Māori, Pacific Peoples, and communities to work towards Aotearoa New Zealand having world-class research capability to respond to serious infectious disease threats.
  • Te Tari Mātāwaka | Ministry for Ethnic Communities as the Government’s chief advisor on ethnic diversity and inclusion in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Whaikaha | Ministry of Disabled People as the Government’s lead agency on promoting how we can undertake appropriate engagement with the disabled community.
  • Te Manatū mō ngā Iwi ō te Moana-nui-ā-Kiwa | Ministry for Pacific Peoples as the Crown’s principal advisor on policies and interventions aimed at improving outcomes for Pacific peoples in Aotearoa.
  • Te Manatū Whakahiato Ora | Ministry of Social Development as the primary provider of social policy advice to the government and sector lead for social development in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Te Pōkai Tara | Universities NZ as the peak body for Aotearoa New Zealand’s eight universities.
  • Cheryl Barnes and Ruth Fairhall as key individuals in the COVID-19 All of Government Response Group.
  • Mike Bush in his capacity as a member of the All of Government leadership response team within the National Crisis Management Centre, and as the former Police Commissioner.

Te Whanganui-a-Tara | Wellington 

  • Te Tari o Te Pirimia Me Te Komiti Matua | Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet as a key government agency that contributed to decision-making in the response to COVID-19.
  • Te Kawa Mataaho | Public Service Commission as the leaders of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Public Service.
  • Te Tai Ōhanga | The Treasury as the Government’s lead economic and financial advisor.
  • Manatū Hauora | Ministry of Health as the Government’s chief steward of the health system.
  • Hīkina Whakatutuki | Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment as a core government agency responsible for a broad range of advice and services that were critical during the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • Public Sector Education Chief Executives (Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga | Ministry of Education, Mana Tohu Mātauranga o Aotearoa | New Zealand Qualifications Authority, and Te Tari Arotake Mātauranga | Education Review Office) as key agencies in Aotearoa New Zealand’s education system.